Skip to main content

Finally, a trailer for 'Paranormal Activity 4'!


Okay, so I'm a big lover of the 'Paranormal' films. The concept is genius and on such a small budget, shows that you don't need digital trickery to fool audiences into being scared. All Orin Peli needs is a video camera, and a whole lot of extras slamming doors & making things that go bang in the night.

So, we now have a trailer for the fourth and (I hope to God) final instalment, due out in October. Before I share my thoughts, see the trailer below:



I have to say; I'm very impressed. Paramount has done an excellent job of keeping the franchise fresh for a modern audience; the 'Skype' idea is pure genius and it's relevant to the kids of today! Okay, so the trailer offers nothing new, shady dialogue, recap of the first 3 films, shadowy figure with static, but I still end up terrified by the end of the 1:42 marker. It's clear that the directors have sat long and hard to think of new ways to continue the story without exhausting the same old ideas such as a chair moving or being dragged down a hallway.

I'm happy that we've returned to the present as well, I couldn't have done with another 'prequel'. As interesting as it was to find out the origins of the demon and the girls, I just wanted to find out what the hell happened to Hunter! You can't leave a film with that kind of cliffhanger! So I'm happy that we finally get to find out what's being going on for the last 6 years. Not forgetting the return of Katie Featherston who was so briefly looked upon in the last film, WE WANT DEMONIC KATIE BACK.

This brings me to the plot and my doubts. When the idea of witches was introduced during the third film, I have to be honest I thought it got a little silly. What was fascinating about the first two films was that the demon had no intentions and was there for no actual reason; just to cause chaos. But to bring witches into it for me lost a sense of the franchise's realism, which was its overall intention was it not? But, if this hopefully the last film in the franchise, the story will come full circle and be explained in a proper manner. I have faith!

All we can do now is wait until the films debut sometime in October, I have high hopes none the less. BUT, I BEG PARAMOUNT, PLEASE LET THIS BE THE LAST ONE. Don't do a 'Saw' and drag a limited plot over eight films, I want this to be a successful franchise!
Kieran x

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How Not To Be A Boy - Robert Webb

"What are we saying to a boy when we tell him to 'man up' or 'act like a man'? More often we're effectively saying, 'Stop expressing those feelings.' And if the boy hears that often enough, it actually starts to sound uncannily like, 'Stop feeling those feelings.'"

Herein lies the main issue that surrounds Robert Webb's new book How Not To Be A Boy, the idea of how much damage that can be inflicted on to young boys when they are encouraged to behave in ways that supposedly befit their gender. But Webb interweaves this idea tenderly with an autobiographical tale of him growing up in 1970s Lincolnshire with a working class woodcutter for a father and a mother who was tragically taken from him when he was just seventeen. 

   Webb frankly admits how he never really felt like much of a 'boy', taking a dislike for sport, writing a diary, having sticky-out ribs and liking poetry. He is told how he is 'sensitive' and 'shy'…

The Goldfish Boy - Lisa Thompson

It's a new year which means it's time to shake off your dusty wigs and get your reading glasses back on as I'm back on the old blogger! It's been a rather busy few months (what EVEN was December?!) but I'm back, with a promise to you all of at LEAST one post per week. So, let's kick things off in style with a good old fashioned book review; what better place to start than January's Book of the Month for Waterstones, Lisa Thompson's debut 'The Goldfish Boy'.

  Matthew Corbin suffers from OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) and rarely does he leave his room. He washes his hands until they crack and bleed, he douses everything with antiseptic spray and he has a secret box of latex gloves under his bed. To pass the time, he observes his neighbours as they go about their daily routines and jots it down in his notepad. Everything is as regular as clockwork, until Mr Charles' grandchildren come to stay, and the youngest, Teddy, goes missing. As the …

How to Stop Time - Matt Haig

"I suddenly realise it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter that we age differently. It doesn't matter that there is no way of resisting the laws of time. The time ahead of you is the like the land beyond the ice. You can guess what it could be like but you can never know. All you know is the moment you are in."

Imagine, for a second, that you were different to everyone else. To others, you may seem like a rather ordinary forty year old, but the reality is you're closer to four hundred and ninety. This is the problem of Tom Hazard, the protagonist of Matt Haig's incredible new novel How to Stop Time. Tom suffers from a rare condition that has caused him to be alive for centuries, ageing one physical year every fifteen years. Always on the move to avoid suspicion, Tom now works in a secondary school as a history teacher, but the one rule he is told never to break keeps making itself known; never fall in love. 

  The joyous quality with Matt Haig is that he trul…