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The Lonely Traveller

We were travellers across worlds dazzling stars and lands far beyond peripheral sight, You the man who bore the fire of the sun  in his crystalised eyes, the passion for eternal knowledge  bristling from your vivacious heart.

You took me by the hand and we danced through the cosmos, jumping from burning comets to shattered moons, thrusting us both into the shimmering tower of light that befitted you a crown, My King. 


From world to world we flew, Botantist Gardens rich with green glaciers that swam like tears, the abode of Everyman encompassing us in comfortable darkness, the singing towers of Tortworth that calmed us when we lost our way, Withybrook’s winding rivers encased us with a profound strength that determined our next steps, these steps took us to the four corners of the universe to unearth every secret; we were happy.


The planets guided us, moulded the foundations of our very being until it was time to rest our weary heads amongst a blanket of stars, laid out by Asteria herself for she took pity on the fati…

Simon James Green Blog Takeover

Since I reviewed Noah Can't Even a few weeks ago, I've been dying to get a hold of Simon James Green as I had a plethora of questions I wanted to ask and as he's so lovely I managed to bag myself an interview with him, so I hereby welcome you to Simon James Green's blog takeover! *trumpet fanfare*

Noah Grimes is the new epitome of teenage awkwardness, is there a little bit of biographical truth deep within the character of Noah? I for one related to many of his problems at school, such as the PE incident...

Thankfully, not too much. As a rule, I was fairly socially inept as a teenager, so there is stuff in the book that’s vaguely based on the sort of things I might do, say or think… although I was never as extreme as Noah, honest! The thing that happens in Sophie’s bathroom where the tap splashes his trousers and it looks like he’s wet himself - that’s real. And I think you’d be hard-pressed (pun intended!) to find a teenage boy who hasn’t encountered any sort of er… boy…

How to Stop Time - Matt Haig

"I suddenly realise it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter that we age differently. It doesn't matter that there is no way of resisting the laws of time. The time ahead of you is the like the land beyond the ice. You can guess what it could be like but you can never know. All you know is the moment you are in."

Imagine, for a second, that you were different to everyone else. To others, you may seem like a rather ordinary forty year old, but the reality is you're closer to four hundred and ninety. This is the problem of Tom Hazard, the protagonist of Matt Haig's incredible new novel How to Stop Time. Tom suffers from a rare condition that has caused him to be alive for centuries, ageing one physical year every fifteen years. Always on the move to avoid suspicion, Tom now works in a secondary school as a history teacher, but the one rule he is told never to break keeps making itself known; never fall in love. 

  The joyous quality with Matt Haig is that he trul…

Noah Can't Even - Simon James Green

Can I even? YES I CAN. Without a doubt, Simon James Green's debut YA novel Noah Can't Even is one of the best books I have read this year; possibly one of my favourite YA books ever. The story follows down-on-his-luck Noah Grimes, as he navigates his way through a turbulent adolescence, filled with awkward mishaps, Wuthering Heights quotes and a very very VERY confusing kiss.

   Five pages in and I found myself bursting out laughing, Green characterises Noah in the most brilliantly awkward yet totally endearing way. When faced with the possibility of a house party Noah asks himself "Would there be nibbles? Noah hoped so.", and deals with 'boy problems' atop some equipment in a PE lesson. Noah's hilarious innate Britishness is what makes the novel with his social ineptitude and it especially resonated with me as it felt like I was reading the diary of my fifteen year old self. I also shed a tear (out of pure hilarity) of how middle class Noah is with his re…

The Power - Naomi Alderman

"Jews: look to Miriam, not Moses, for what you can learn from her. Muslims: look to Fatimah, not Muhammad. Buddhists, remember Tara, the mother of liberation. Christians: pray to Mary for your salvation." It is through these haunting words that Naomi Alderman creates a novel so bold and so daring in order to show us how the present structures of society need a change, and offers us a glimpse of what would happen if you flipped the gender roles in which women rule the world. What would then happen if men lived in fear of women?

The Power begins as teenage girls over the world discover they can release electrical jolts from their fingertips, ranging from a slight tickle to the ability to kill. Men are segregated for their own safety, countries verge on war on a day-to-day basis as more girls harness this 'power' and use it to awaken it in older women. As this all unfolds, the story weaves between four narrative voices: Roxy, daughter of a London mobster, Allie, a teenag…

The Bookshop Girl - Sylvia Bishop

If you're reading this, chances are, you probably like books. You probably would go as far to say you LOVE books, that if you chance upon a bookshop on your travels that you just HAVE to pop in for a browse and end up losing the rest of your day in there. This love for bookshops and love for reading is encapsulated perfectly in Sylvia Bishop's The Bookshop Girl, her follow up to Erica's Elephant

  Perkily illustrated by my bookselling chum Ashley King, The Bookshop Girl follows the adventures of Property Jones, who lives in a second hand bookshop after she was left there in a cupboard when she was a baby, who wins the opportunity of a lifetime to look after the renowned Montgomery Book Emporium. But can Property save the day when a sinister Mr Pink shows up demanding a rare and valuable manuscript? And will she ever reveal her biggest secret? 

  One of the biggest perks of Bishop's writing is how charming and breezy it is. The story reminded me of Dahl's 'Charl…

Into the Water - Paula Hawkins

Chances are that most of you reading this will have read Paula Hawkins' The Girl on the Train, a book that took the world by storm and to this day has sold close to 20 million copies worldwide, hit the No.1 spot in 26 territories and has been turned into a feature film adaption that was a box office hit. But the question lingers in the air that befalls all debut authors after so high a success, can lightening strike twice? Hawkins certainly gives it her all in her new novel Into the Water, in which a small town is rocked by the drowning of a local woman in the bend of the river known, for centuries, as the drowning pool. The victim's sister, Jules, now has to return to the town, to the one place she swore she would never return to and care for the teenage daughter her sister left behind. But why is Jules so afraid? And what secrets are left to be uncovered?

   As someone who didn't really get on with The Girl on the Train I didn't have the highest of expectations going …

Little Deaths - Emma Flint

In the summer of 1965, two young children go missing in Queens while in the care of their mother. After an investigation is mounted and the search begins, both children are found dead. Neighbors speculate, whisper, that the mother, the enthralling, intoxicating yet secretive Ruth Malone is to blame. Soon the police and the press are quick to jump to convenient conclusions but is Ruth really capable of murder?

   It's no mere coincidence that the title of the book derives from the french saying 'la petite mort', a euphemism that refers specifically to likening the sensation of orgasm to death. This is, primarily, a novel about sexuality and femininity; how women are punished for being confident in their overt sexuality told through the misty haze of a noir murder mystery. Interestingly, the novel is adapted from the real life case of two small children disappearing then being found dead later in which the mother was arrested, after two long years in the public eye. Ruth embo…

Review | La La Land

As we all know, 2016 was a pretty bad year for everyone. Celebrities dropping dead willy nilly, Brexit being an actual THING and a walking buffoon with weetabix for hair became President of the United States. Fortunately, 2017 has already gone off to a flying start thanks to the gorgeously romantic and charming musical film, 'La La Land', directed by Damien Chazelle (of 'Whiplash' fame). An ode to old Hollywood and MGM musicals, 'La La Land' follows the story of aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) and aspiring jazz musician Seb (Ryan Gosling) as they become entangled into a passionate relationship that threatens to hinder both of them from following their dreams.

   This was a film that I simply could not stop smiling at. From its big opening number set on gridlocked freeway involving a flash mob to the moving epilogue at the film's end, 'La La Land' churns out buckets of charm without ever falling into the overbearingly cheesy category. The film plays…

The Goldfish Boy - Lisa Thompson

It's a new year which means it's time to shake off your dusty wigs and get your reading glasses back on as I'm back on the old blogger! It's been a rather busy few months (what EVEN was December?!) but I'm back, with a promise to you all of at LEAST one post per week. So, let's kick things off in style with a good old fashioned book review; what better place to start than January's Book of the Month for Waterstones, Lisa Thompson's debut 'The Goldfish Boy'.

  Matthew Corbin suffers from OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) and rarely does he leave his room. He washes his hands until they crack and bleed, he douses everything with antiseptic spray and he has a secret box of latex gloves under his bed. To pass the time, he observes his neighbours as they go about their daily routines and jots it down in his notepad. Everything is as regular as clockwork, until Mr Charles' grandchildren come to stay, and the youngest, Teddy, goes missing. As the …